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CULTISM IN NIGERIA PART 1

Bloodshed agony pains ruthlessness and lack of regards for life is what follows when this frat boys or cultists come to town there is hardly an higher institutions without them it has even become a street rivalry because i has moved from the institutions to the secondary schools and crept into the primary too(I’ll be exploring this later in the series). Homes and lives have been shattered promising young lives wasted all because some people somewhere with no regards for life kill themselves in the battle for supremacy.How did this confranternity start and how did it end up getting out of hands? Was bloodshed and rivalry the foundation of their origin? If not was it inevitable even if it wasn’t ? 

It all started from Pyrate ConfraternityIn 1952, future-Nobel Prize winning author Wole Soyinka and a group of six friends formed the Pyrate Confraternity at the elite University College, Ibadan, then part of the University of London.According to the Pyrates, the “Magnificent Seven”, as they called themselves, observed that the university was populated with wealthy students associated with the colonial powers and a few poorer students striving in manner and dress to be accepted by the more advantaged students, while social life was dictated by tribal affiliation.Soyinka would later note that the Pyrates wanted to differentiate themselves from “stodgy establishment and its pretentious products in a new educational institution different from a culture of hypocritical and affluent middleclass, different from alienated colonial aristocrats”.The organization adopted the motto “Against all conventions”, the skull and crossbones as their logo, while members adopted confraternity names such as “Cap’n Blood” and “Long John Silver”. When fellow students protested a proposal to build a railroad across the road leading to the university, fearing that easier transportation would make the university less exclusive, the Pyrates successfully ridiculed the argument as elitist. Roughly analogous to the fraternities and sororities of North America, the Pyrates Confraternity proved popular among students, even after the original members moved on. Membership was open to any promising male student, regardless of tribe or race, but selection was stringent and most applicants were denied. For almost 20 years, the Pyrates were the only confraternity on Nigerian campuses.
However In the late 1960s, campuses were roiled by the civil war wracking the country. Details are contested, but it appears that in 1972 Bolaji Carew and several others were expelled from the Pyrates for failing to meet expected standards. In reaction to this and other events, the Pyrates registered themselves under the name National Association of Seadogs (NAS) and, at least one source states, pulled the confraternity out of the universities. Carew went on to found the Buccaneers Confraternity (also called the National Associations of Sea Lords), largely copying the Seadogs’ structure, symbols and ceremonies. A major impetus for the creation of new confraternities was the fact that members of the new groups simply did not meet the high academic and intellectual standards set by the Seadogs, and thus considered the original organization to be elitist.However, Soyinka would later point to individuals who became accustomed to exerting power in the rigidly hierarchical confraternity, and were unwilling to give it up, as to blame for the initial schism(A split or separation within a group or organization, typically caused by discord).
As new groups formed, inter-group tensions led to fighting, though these were initially limited to fistfights.The Supreme Eiye Confraternity (also known as the National Association of Air Lords) was formed in the University of Ibadan in 1965.In the 1980s confraternities spread throughout the over 300 institutions of higher education in the country. The Neo-Black Movement of Africa (also called Black Axe) emerged from the University of Benin in Edo State. In 1983 students at the University of Calabar in Cross River State founded the Eternal Fraternal Order of the Legion Consortium (the Klan Konfraternity), the Supreme Vikings Confraternity (the Adventurers or, alternately, the De Norsemen Club of Nigeria) the following year.[4] This time period saw a drastic change in the role of the confraternities. The coup of Ibrahim Babangida in 1983 caused a large degree of political tension. Military leaders, beginning in the 1980s, began to see the confraternities as a check on the student unions and university staff, who were the only organized groups opposing military rule. The confraternities were thus provided payment and weapons to use against student activists, though the weapons were often used in deadly inter-confrater which was where trouble started for Nigerian Universities. 

A QUICK LOOK AT A FEW AND THEIR WAYS

  1. Buccaneers Association of Nigeria (BAN) COLOR YELLOW
    Alora—Sealords
    In 1972, Bolaji Crew (Code-named “Late Ahoy Rica Ricardo”) and others were expelled from the Pyrates for failing to meet expected standards. Carew went on to found the Buccaneers Confraternity (also called the National Associations of Sea Lords), largely copying the Seadogs’ structure, symbols and ceremonies. A major impetus for the creation of new confraternities was the fact that members of the new groups simply did not meet the high academic and intellectual standards set by the Seadogs, and thus considered the original organization to be elitist.. Different notorious cult groups had emerging without check from the concerned authority, unleashing terror on humanity and posterity. 

Some beliefs and sayings:
No prize no payNo brothers in the woodNo laughing on boardBlood for bloodLet the devil that lead you guide youThey have other sayings, which are basically thereby to make new members feel they made the right choice in belonging to a fraternity with such high code of conduct and discipline.
Members are known as: Fine boys, Ban Boys, Alora, Bucketmen, Lords, etc


2. Black Axe Confraternity (COLOR BLACK)
Aye-Axemen
The Neo-Black Movement of Africa (also called Black Axe) was formed at the University of Benin in Benin City in 1976 by some young men with the motive of building a body to fight against the oppression against Black men (Students) at the university. Those who initiated this association are rumoured to be runaways from Neo black Movement of Africa, an organization in South Africa that fought the apartheid war and escaped into Nigeria for safety. Investigation has shown that it was the borrowed notion that was imported to Nigeria.
Some of their beliefs and saying includes:
The Black man will be freed with an axeNo phyuk upsForgiveness is a sinDon’t betray your brother in the hoodObey before complain or AbeyanceHe who price must payMembers are referred to as: Aye Axe-men, Seven (7) or Amigos

Eiye Confraternity (COLOR BLUE)
Haba-Krier
The Supreme Eiye( yoruba for bird) Confraternity (also known as the National Association of Air Lords) was formed in the University of Ibadan in 1965, also affiliated to the Eiye Secret Society, which exist in the western part of Nigeria. It was formed by the following students: Goke Adeniji, Dele Nwakpele, Bayo Adenubi, Bode Fadase, Tunde Aluko, Kayode Oke, and Bode Sowunmi among others.  It was named Eiye group and later metamorphosed into Supreme Eiye Confraternity (SEC). This cult group was established to make positive impact on the social-political mind, social cultural, physical and mental development of its members, and where indifferent to other conventional cult group. 
Beliefs and sayings:
SecrecyAutocracyDisciplineBrotherhoodNo Friend No FoeMembers are referred to as: Fliers, Airforce, Airlords, e.t.cI WENT THROUGH THE BLUE SEA WITH THE LINKING BOAT…………I WENT THROUGH THE RED SEA WITH OUT NO BAILING……………I WENT THROUGH THE YELLOW SEA WITHOUT NO PARDLE…………..AND I STILL CROSS MY PANAMA AND STILL SHOUT HYBARKRIER……….AIRLORD……WE SHALL ALWAY FLY TO OUR LIMIT….ATAH.TO ALL FLYERS.RUGGED…

to be continued

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